Cadre – Non-Medical Attendant (NMA)

The Non-Medical Attendant (NMA) program is designed for seriously wounded, ill and injured Soldiers who could benefit from the presence and assistance of Family or friends. If the Soldier’s primary care manager (PCM) determines that the Soldier is eligible for NMA assistance, then one person, designated by the Soldier, is authorized to serve as a NMA. This person provides additional support as the Soldier recovers, rehabilitates and transitions. Personal support may include driving the Soldier to appointments, providing a safe home environment, assisting with shopping, assisting with medication management, and/or assisting with managing medical and administrative paperwork.

Related Policies and Resources

The following Warrior Care and Transition (WCT) resources are available to assist you in learning more about the NMA program and how to help Soldiers obtain NMA orders:

  1. Warrior Transition Unit Non-Medical Attendants Policy
  2. Enclosure 1: NMA Entitlements
  3. Enclosure 2: NMA Roles and Responsibilities
  4. Enclosure 3: DTS Self Registration Worksheet
  5. Enclosure 4: NMA Orientation Brief for Cadre
  6. Enclosure 5: NMA Orientation Brief for Primary Care Managers
  7. Enclosure 6: NMA Orientation Brief for Nurse Case Managers
  8. Enclosure 7: Care for the Caregiver Training
  9. Enclosure 8: PCM Request for NMA Orders
  10. Enclosure 9: Soldier Duty Status Change Request
  11. Enclosure 10: DTS Counseling
  12. Enclosure 11: Termination of NMA Status
  13. Enclosure 12: Appeal of NMA Decision
  14. Enclosure 13: NMA Definitions
  15. Enclosure 14: Invitational Travel Orders Matrix

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How is SCAADL different from a NMA?
How can my Soldier obtain a NMA?
How is a NMA different from any other supportive Family or friend?
What kind of activities does a NMA do to support a Soldier?
How long do NMAs support a Soldier?
What are the official duties of a NMA?
As a cadre member, how can I learn more about my responsibilities regarding NMAs?

How is SCAADL different from a NMA?

Special Compensation for Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (SCAADL) is a program that provides funds directly to a Soldier so that a Soldier may pay a home health aide to provide the Soldier with assistance with activities of daily living such as bathing, eating, and dressing.  A NMA is a person that provides support to the Soldier, while the Soldier recovers and heals.

How can my Soldier obtain a NMA?

When a seriously wounded, ill and injured Soldier is in outpatient status, the Soldier’s PCM determines that a Soldier may benefit from having someone near him/her to provide support and encouragement during recovery. Once the PCM makes this determination, the PCM must submit a request for the Soldier to have a NMA to the commander, who must approve the request.

How is a NMA different from any other supportive Family or friend?

NMAs differ from Families that provide support in that they are placed on official military orders. This provides them with certain entitlements to help while they provide support to the Soldier. Please refer to Warrior Transition Unit Non-Medical Attendants Policy for additional details.

What kind of activities does a NMA do to support a Soldier?

NMAs provide personal support to the Soldier, which may include the following activities:

  • Escort/drive to and from appointments
  • Assist with shopping
  • Help the Soldier create a safe living environment
  • Advocate for Soldier
  • Motivate the Soldier
  • Assist the Soldier with the medication of their medications
  • Assist the Soldier with managing medical and administrative paperwork

Please see the NMA Responsibilities section of the Warrior Transition Unit Non-Medical Attendants Policy to learn more about their official duties.

How long do NMAs support a Soldier?

The PCM must determine the timeframe based on the Soldier’s needs, but support is typically provided in 30 day increments, up to 180 days. Thirty days prior to the end of the NMA order, the PCM should re-evaluate the Soldier. If the need continues, PCMs must submit a request to the Commander to extend the time period. Once the Soldier no longer needs a NMA, the PCM will formally counsel the Soldier and NMA with the reason for discontinuing NMA orders . Soldiers can appeal to the Warrior Transition Unit (WTU) surgeon or deputy commander of clinical services at the hospital if assigned to a WTU without a battalion surgeon.

What are the official duties of a NMA?

Besides providing support to the Soldier (as outlined in Question 4), the NMA is required to perform the following:

  • Meet with a Defense Travel System (DTS) specialist. The DTS specialist will help the NMA complete paperwork necessary to receive per diem funds (if the NMA qualifies for per diem funds) or any funds related to travel. The NMA should come prepared to the meeting with their DTS Self Registration Worksheet , checking account number, bank routing number, and identification card. The DTS specialist will provide guidance to the NMA on the need for receipts, when travel vouchers need to be complete, and other important matters.
  • Receive DTS counseling. During the NMA’s meeting with a DTS specialist, the NMA will receive “counseling” from the specialist. This counseling provides a written record of everything that the NMA will need to do with the DTS to receive payment (if the NMA is entitled to it).
  • Complete company-level in-processing. The unit will want to ensure they have the NMA’s contact information and other demographic data to ensure they can provide the NMA with assistance when needed.
  • Along with Soldier, meet with squad leader at least weekly. The NMA should meet with the squad leader weekly to ensure the Soldier understands his/her schedule.
  • Along with the Soldier, meet with the NCM at least monthly. The NMA should meet with the NCM monthly to ensure appointments are made in a timely manner.
  • Attend appointments with Soldier. The Soldier will determine if he/she would like the NMA to go into the medical appointments with them, but the NMA should escort or assist the Soldier in going to and from medical as well as other appointments.
  • Attend formations and Town Halls with Soldier at least quarterly. NMAs should attend formations and attend Town Halls to receive information, provide feedback on the program, and have their concerns addressed. A Soldier’s squad leader should be able to provide the NMA with meeting times and locations.
  • Attend Family Readiness Group meetings at least quarterly. Family Readiness Groups provide proactive education and support that enhance self reliance and family well-being. It is an effective interface between the command and Families. The unit commander should be able to provide meeting times and locations.
  • Meet with ombudsmen within 30 days of arrival. The ombudsman is a member of the hospital staff that hears and investigates complaints and helps facilitate resolutions to the issues. Meeting with the ombudsmen will provide knowledge of what they can do should you have a complaint or concern that your unit leadership cannot manage. The Soldier’s squad leader should be able to provide meeting times and locations.
  • Meet with SFAC within 30 days of arrival. The Soldier Family Assistance Center (SFAC) is a one-stop location that provides support services to Soldiers and Families that are assigned to the WTUs They provide an array of services such as child care, financial planning, legal assistance and educational programs. The Soldier’s squad leader should be able to provide meeting times and locations.
  • Complete NMA orientation brief within one week of assignment as NMA. To ensure you understand the your role as a NMA, the WTU or CCU will provide briefing that outlines the duties, responsibilities, and entitlements of NMA. During the brief, please take the time to ask questions so your leadership team can ensure you are comfortable in your role as a NMA. The Soldier’s squad leader should be able to provide meeting times and locations.
  • Complete WTU orientation within 30 days of assignment as NMA. The WTUs are a special Army unit that enables Soldiers to heal, recovery, reintegrate, and transition. As most NMAs are not familiar with the day-to-day operations of a military unit or the WTUs, this briefing will provide an overview of the WTU and the day to day operations to you will be part of. The Soldier’s squad leader should be able to provide meeting times and locations.
  • Complete IDES familiarity briefing within 30 days of arrival. Many of our Soldiers will go through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES). This is a process to determine if the Soldier 1) meets retention standards; 2) is fit (or capable) for service; and 3) if not fit for Service, determines compensation (if applicable). It is important to be familiar with the process if your Soldier will go through the IDES. We encourage you to go several times to truly understand the system. Your Soldier’s squad leader will be able to provide you with meeting times and locations.
  • Complete installation fire and safety training. It is important for the NMA to understand the fire and safety especially as the NMA may be assist if an emergency occurs. The squad leader will provide information on when and where the training will occur.
  • Attend first aid and CPR training. Some units may offer CPR and first aid training. If interested, please inform your squad leader and NCM.

As a cadre member, how can I learn more about my responsibilities regarding NMAs?

Please refer to Warrior Transition Unit Non-Medical Attendants Policy for additional information. Cadre Training on NMAs is also available:

If you need additional information or have a specific question, you can also ask us via the Cadre Collaboration Portal (CAC-only access).

Return to FAQ Question List
Return to top of page